News and blog

Welcome to the blog.
Posted 4/7/2010 1:47pm by Ty Zemelsky.

March 30, 2010

Not to put too fine a point on it, but-we’re having a great spring.  There are a number of reasons to be feeling this way.  Top on our list though is the great early Spring spinach that we’ve been selling both at Farmer’s Markets and to our restaurants. These greens were planted in late fall , spending most of the winter barely growing at all.  With the relentless return of stronger and longer light, they began to grow, starting at the end of January.  In addition to the spinach,  there have been plantings of mizuna, hot spicey mustard , kale and arugula started in mid february.  These plantings are now ready for harvest.  Additionally, outside we’ve benefited from our low tunnel system.(see our blog 2/11/10 for details).  These low tunnels are now full of early chard, beets, carrots.  They should be ready for harvest in 3-4 weeks.  The young baby lettuces have begun to be harvested.  They are a welcome addition to our salad mix, both in flavor and bright vibrant red color. Before the big rains came, we were able to get a first planting of the bordeaux spinach outside.  This would be pretty early for us to have planted outside at this date.

In the nursery, there are thousands of baby tomato plants, basils, parsley , chives, peppers. Lots of these plants will be going to the early May Farmers Market so that many of you will be able to grow some of the same plants that we are growing at  Star Light Gardens.  Notable tomato plants that we would recommend are Sun Golds,Green Zebra Paul Robeson, Juliets,  Cherokee Purple and Wapsipinnicon.  In addition to the Farmer’s Markets, they will also be available at our farmstand at 54 Fowler Ave./Durham, CT  starting in early May.

We are on the eve of our first tomato planting in the greenhouse.  This has always been an exciting time for us.  Once these plants go in the ground,  they will be an intregal part of our daily lives untill late September.  If you count the planting date, which is Feb 10. , that would mean that we will have had a relationship with these plants for over 7 months!

Right now we have wonderful greens available. First, there are salad greens.  In the mix you can find beet greens claytonia, red oakleaf lettuce, green oakleaf lettuce, rouge d'hiver, spinach, red russian kale.
Also, available now are two different kinds of spinach: samish and 7 green.  Both varieties are full of sweet flavor and texture. On the near horizon, we will be able to harvest pea tendrils and arugula.   Come visit us at CitySeed at Wooster Square , Fairfield Farmer's Market at the Fairfield Theatre Company and the Litchfield FarmersMarket.

Our farmstand will be open soon with many tomatoe plants, herbs and peppers.


Posted 2/11/2010 9:58am by David Zemelsky.

Now our days are longer than 10 hours.  This  means that the days are long enough to see real growth in existing plants that are in our High Tunnels(aka hoophouse).    The time that is below a 10 hour day is known as the Persephone Period, name because of the Greek myth about how plants  stopped  growing while Persephone was held captive in the underworld by Hades (see Wickipedia  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persephone).  While it is not exactly true that all growth stops during this time period (October 13-January 29th),  it certainly slows to a trickle.

At this point in the year, we've harvested all of our greens and are already seeing a lot of regrowth.   This is a wonderful thing, as we've been enjoying supplying our restaurants and farmers markets all winter and now look forward to resuming shortly.  Our greens are always delicious, but the big attraction to winter greens is their sweetness.  This is largely because the cold weather causes the starches in the plant leafs to change into carbohydrates, a simple sugar.

This is also the time of year to be thinking about tomatoes.  Our first planting of tomatoes goes into the one High Tunnel that has a heat source around March 29th.   A tomato plant wants to be around 6-7 weeks old at the time of planting.  That means that we'll be starting tomatoes next week.  Hard to believe.  Very hard to believe.  But then again, growing helps one feel like Spring is right around the corner.  We'll be busy setting up grow lights in the basement this week.  Right on the heals of tomato planting will be onions, peppers,lettuce heads and herbs.  Growing in the basement goes on for a few more weeks and then we transfer everything to our nursery that is out in a hoop houses.  We have built a 10' x 20'  houses inside this hoop house and installed a small propane furnace.

Meanwhile, we'll be preparing new beds throughout the different hoop houses for spring greens.  These will be planted out with arugula, mixed lettuce, kale, spicey mustard greens, tatzoi, mizuna and pak choi.  Can't wait.  It is hard to beat the feeling of working in a hoop house on a cold, sunny winter day.  You don't need a coat and it feels like a day in May.  This is a great substitute for going to Florida in February.  Infact, one winter when we couldn't go anywhere, we satisfied or warm sun needs by bringing lawn furniture out to the hoop house and sprawled out in total luxury.

During the last warm spell when all the  snow melted, I had the opportunity to look under some of the outside rowcovers.  It was amazing to see live and tasty spinach growing there.  As soon as warm weather arrives, these plants should really start to take off.
We also have several low tunnels that are performing really well.  These are made from wirehoops that make a low arc over the greens bed.  Plastic is put over the hoops and weighed down with sandbags on the edges and corners.  We planted lettuce, chard, beets and carrots around the beginning of November.  At this point, everything is small in there.  With the return of the light and warmer weather, all of these greens will make great progress.  And interesting part of all this is that baby baby lettuce can survive the harsh temperatures, but larger leaves will turn to mush.  Like all our winter greens, they have an anti-freeze system of sorts whereby the water migrates out of the plant cell and concentrates deeper down in the leaf, lowering its freezing point.  This is how we are able to provide fresh greens to restaurants and farmers market all year round.Now our days are longer than 10 hours.  This  means that the days are long enough to see real growth in existing plants that are in our High Tunnels(aka hoophouse).    The time that is below a 10 hour day is known as the Persephone Period, name because of the Greek myth about how plants  stopped  growing while Persephone was held captive in the underworld by Hades (see Wickipedia  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persephone).  While it is not exactly true that all growth stops during this time period (October 13-January 29th),  it certainly slows to a trickle.

At this point in the year, we've harvested all of our greens and are already seeing a lot of regrowth.   This is a wonderful thing, as we've been enjoying supplying our restaurants and farmers markets all winter and now look forward to resuming shortly.  Our greens are always delicious, but the big attraction to winter greens is their sweetness.  This is largely because the cold weather causes the starches in the plant leafs to change into carbohydrates, a simple sugar.

This is also the time of year to be thinking about tomatoes.  Our first planting of tomatoes goes into the one High Tunnel that has a heat source around March 29th.   A tomato plant wants to be around 6-7 weeks old at the time of planting.  That means that we'll be starting tomatoes next week.  Hard to believe.  Very hard to believe.  But then again, growing helps one feel like Spring is right around the corner.  We'll be busy setting up grow lights in the basement this week.  Right on the heals of tomato planting will be onions, peppers,lettuce heads and herbs.  Growing in the basement goes on for a few more weeks and then we transfer everything to our nursery that is out in a hoop houses.  We have built a 10' x 20'  houses inside this hoop house and installed a small propane furnace.

Meanwhile, we'll be preparing new beds throughout the different hoop houses for spring greens.  These will be planted out with arugula, mixed lettuce, kale, spicey mustard greens, tatzoi, mizuna and pak choi.  Can't wait.  It is hard to beat the feeling of working in a hoop house on a cold, sunny winter day.  You don't need a coat and it feels like a day in May.  This is a great substitute for going to Florida in February.  Infact, one winter when we couldn't go anywhere, we satisfied or warm sun needs by bringing lawn furniture out to the hoop house and sprawled out in total luxury.

During the last warm spell when all the  snow melted, I had the opportunity to look under some of the outside rowcovers.  It was amazing to see live and tasty spinach growing there.  As soon as warm weather arrives, these plants should really start to take off.
We also have several low tunnels that are performing really well.  These are made from wirehoops that make a low arc over the greens bed.  Plastic is put over the hoops and weighed down with sandbags on the edges and corners.  We planted lettuce, chard, beets and carrots around the beginning of November.  At this point, everything is small in there.  With the return of the light and warmer weather, all of these greens will make great progress.  And interesting part of all this is that baby baby lettuce can survive the harsh temperatures, but larger leaves will turn to mush.  Like all our winter greens, they have an anti-freeze system of sorts whereby the water migrates out of the plant cell and concentrates deeper down in the leaf, lowering its freezing point.  This is how we are able to provide fresh greens to restaurants and farmers market all year round.

Posted 7/7/2009 12:33pm by David Zemelsky.

My assignment for the 4th of July family picnic was to bring salad and corn on the cob. The salad was easy but the corn on the cob? There was none at City Seed that day ,where David was doing the market at Wooster Square and none at a local  corn stand. So I gathered lots of sungolds and bloody butchers to drizzle with olive oil and garnish with basil. Then I saw the garlic-- row after row of it. I hanked seven of them out of the ground, cut their leaves and roots off and peeled off their outer skins. I liberally drizzled that olive oil once again, put them in  a  small cast iron fry pan and baked them. I started them at 350 but raised them later to 450. They were golden and soft in a half hour or so.

Arrivng at the party, all attention was on the gorgeous hoola hoops that a friend makes. Everyone was doing it from the just turned five year olds, to the almost fortys, to the nearly sixties. I fell in love with the feel of picking up a hoola hoop and still knowing exactly how to use it after all these years. 

After wild and wooly hooping,the feasting began. Nobody noticed that the corn was missing as the beautiful roasted garlics were swooned over. Even the just turned fives loved them, for they were sweet as sweet can be.

Later that night I took my brand new sparkly green and purple hoola hoop home and hooped under the nearly full moon as if I had just turned five.

 

 

 

Posted 6/26/2009 8:25pm by David Zemelsky.

ripe sungolds

About two weeks ago, while scouting out our 2000 tomato plants, I  discovered a ripe sungold. Finally. Of course I picked this tomato and found Ty, to continue our tradition of experiencing the very first tomato of the season together.   I felt this instant connection to the cycle seasons long gone and plates of sliced tomatoes devoured on summer nights.  That most flavorful moment marked the beginning of our 2009 tomato season. Its been a long winter and rainy spring since fresh heirloom tomatoes have been available in Connecticut. And by the time I have gotten around to writing this, each day brings more and more tomatoes as well as more varieties.

tomato jungle

How did we get to this moment?  Our tomato program starts in early February-six weeks before we plant them in the high tunnels.  We will start hundred of new plants in soil in trays that sit on probagation mats- a source of heat that speeds both the rate and the speed of germination.  Plastic domes are left on these trays until the plant emerges from the soil-usually 4-6 days.  After 10 days, they are removed from the mats and placed under grow lights.  There  they will remain for the 4-5 weeks to be planted then in our  only high tunnel that has supplimental heat.  This year, these plants were planted on March 24th.  The other hoop houses do not have heat, so  we need to be sure that later planted tomatoes won't get a frost.  That usually means that they will be planted at the beginning of May.  We have found that there are several important advantages to growing tomatoes in high tunnels.   Sometimes, just a few temperature degrees between the inside and out,  can mean life or death for a small plant on a chilly morning. Another advantage is that  all of our houses have driptape irrigation.  This gives the tomatoes what they want- moist feet and dry overcoats.  The driptape is hooked to an electronic system that delivers water to each tunnel for a specific amount of time.  Tomatoes like to get a drink before sunrise.  In our earliest house we planted Bloody Butcher, Glacier, Sungold, Prudens Purple and Yellow Gold.   These are all early varieties, a bit small compared to other heirlooms, but mighty tasty.  Later comes the Paul Robeson, Cherokee Purple, Green Zebra, Striped Germanand Waspinnicon, to name but a few.

tomato blossom

ripening sungolds


Last night three of our young grandchildren came to visit. They were excited to see  the " tomato jungle."  The plants are over 9 feet tall now, but should reach 13-14 feet before the end of the season. Darting through the rows, they quickly collected several pounds of ripe tomatoes.  It turns out that grandchildren really like to find, pick and gaze at tomatoes.  But what they really like to do best is take one bite out of the fruit, suck out all the juices and toss the rest onto the floor.  I accidently stepped on several of them last night. It was worth it.

tomatoes early box

Now we are poised to have a waterfall - like arrival of tomatoes-more tomatoes than we can imagine . With over 1800 plants and 30 varieties, we will soon be graced by their wild colors and flavors all through summer and well into fall.